Intel_Galileo

How to post to a Microsoft Azure Service Bus using Intel Galileo

In my previous post, I walked you through on how to Install Python Azure SDK on Intel Galileo.

Let’s now put that Python SDK into some work and post something to an Azure Service Bus Queue.

It’s really rather straight forward:

The only thing is to Base64 encode your string to be compatible with the other Azure SDK’s, in case you want compatibility with WIndows/Android/iOS etc.

But before we run this, you would need to set the on board clock on the Intel Galilelo, otherwise you will get this error:

So, they easiest way is to synchronise the clock against a time server:

You will need to do this every time after you have shut down the board, since the clock is not battery backed up. So it might be a good idea to put this in a script and have it run at startup.

There you have it.

 

 

Intel_Galileo

Install Python Azure SDK on Intel Galileo

This  post walks you through the steps to install Python Azure SDK on Intel Galileo.

 

Requirements:

  • An Intel Galileo board (Gen 1 or 2)
  • The full Linux boot image
  • Internet connection (either using the built in Ethernet port or using a mini-PCIe WiFi board)
  • CURL with SSL/TLS support

Step 1 Get the big Linux image

You will need to boot in to the full Linux image, which you can download from Intel’s  download page.

Step 2 Boot into Linux

Extract the contents of that compressed file onto a SD card and boot the Galileo from it.

Step 3 Install prerequisites

SSH into your Galileo board as root (no password by default)

Make sure the latest CURL and OpenSSL are installed

latest_installed

The Linux image I was using at the time of this writing did not have any Root CA certificates installed. Sure, one could bypass certificate validation using Curl’s -k option, but that’s cheating.

First, create the default certificate directories:

Download the latest CA certificates

(Yes yes, I know about -k, but this is a catch 22 moment, we need to get the certs down  from an SSL/TLS connection in the first place)

Step 4 Download and install PIP

Download and install the Python PIP

install_pip

 Step 5 Install the Python Azure SDK

pip_install_azure

 

 Step 6 Verify

Now we can verify that Python can access the Azure SDK

 

verify_azure

There you have it. So, what cool things can we do with Microsoft Azure and an Intel Galileo? Let me know in the comments below.

Xamarin Studio java.lang.OutOfMemoryError

Xamarin Studio is a very buggy and flaky product. Having being used it on an every day basis, it’s getting rather frustrating to deal with Xamarins inferior QA.

Here’s one example that keeps on coming up on the “Stable” channel. (I have to bite my tongue really hard not to say what I think about their definition of “Stable”)

This is the dreaded java.lang.OutOfMemoryError:

XamarinStudioOutOfMemory

 

Despite having reported this as a bug, it hasn’t been addressed at all. I am still seeing this on Xamarin Studio for OS X v5.4 (build 420).

Here’s a workaround:

Edit the .csproj file and edit the JavaMaximumHeapSize element and set its value to 1G.